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Enel Green Power South Africa (EGP RSA) celebrates its Tom Burke solar photovoltaic (PV) power plant, located on a site declared a National Key Point in Limpopo Province.
According to a company statement, the project marks the IPPs’ first large-scale solar project and first thin film photovoltaic (PV) panels in the country.
The power plant, with an installed capacity of 66MW, reached early generation and commercial operation date in August 2016.
Tom Burke solar power plant in strategic position
The location of the site where the solar plant is was a National Key Point. The declaration of this Key Point was in line with South Africa’s National Key Point Act (1980).
Furthermore, it is in acknowledgement of its strategic importance of feeding 122GWh per year into the national grid. It will also provide electricity supply to nine villages in the Lephalale region.
Also read:Enel Green Power celebrates its Tom Burke solar plant in South Africa
The company statement highlighted that Tom Burke occupying 202 hectares. It can avoid the emission of over 1,11000 tonnes of CO2 into the atmosphere each year.
After reaching COD the plant moved into its operations and maintenance (O&M) phase, producing an average energy output of 350 to 360MWh per day, enough to power approximately 200,000 rural households daily.
O&M phase
During the O&M phase, the solar plant was closely monitored via an on-site control room, as well as the company’s 24-hour centralized control room in Sandton, north of Johannesburg.
The monitoring allows for an analysis of the solar power plant’s performance at inverter level. This allows the plant’s staff to immediately address potential issues and maximize efficiencies wherever possible.
Cleaning of the solar panels is twice yearly to maximize output.
Country manager in South Africa, William Price, said that South Africa is a resource-rich country. “We are also proud to provide an increasingly integrated offering and a strong renewable energy generation base.”
He further added, “We firmly believe that by taking advantage of renewable energies we can improve electrification in Southern Africa.  Additionally, we will incorporate current and available technologies to bridge the gap between supply and demand for energy.”

Source: Construction review

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Kenyans are rushing to beat the November 30 deadline for the installation of solar water heating systems. This is bringing more opportunities for suppliers of such products, an energy company has said.
According to the Energy Regulations of 2012, all industrial, commercial and large residential buildings in urban centers are required to install solar water heating systems.
The deadline was May 25 but saw an extension to Nov 30 by the Energy Regulatory Commission. This was to give Kenyans more time to implement the rule. Property owners who fail to comply with the law risk fines of up to 10,000 U.S. dollars.
Karanja Njoroge, General Manager of Chloride Exide, a solar solutions and emerging renewable energy products firm, said the law has increased demand for solar products in the country.  “We have therefore increased out personnel in order to assist Kenyans to conform to the regulations,” he added. The East African nation enacted the Solar Water Heating Regulations in 2012. Further more, it gave building owners a five-year grace period to implement the order.

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Tanzania is planning to upgrade the 14.2km dual carriageway stretch of the Arusha-Holili road. However, Tanzania is looking to get the project funds from development partners to upgrade the remaining part of the road.
Moreover, the government has made a step of approaching the government of Japan. This is to secure funds for road upgrading towards Moshi. Negotiations are ongoing on how best to extend the road from Tengeru to Usa River; also the rehabilitation of the Kikafu Bridge near Moshi.
Upgrading cost
Arusha-Holili Road is part of the 240km regional road that extends to Voi in Kenya. The road is currently undergoing upgrad within the framework of the East African Road Project (EARP) at a cost of US$400mn.
Besides, the project is part of the vast network of major roads agenda for massive rehabilitation throughout the East African Community (EAC) bloc to facilitate cross-border trade and movement of people.

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In 2015, The World Bank headed to Tanzania where it teamed up with Drone Adventures, Humanitarian OpenStreetMap and the Tanzanian Commission of Science and Technology (COSTECH) to conduct urban mapping projects using senseFly eBee drones.
In Dar es Salaam, Tanzania’s largest city, The World Bank (TWB) is working with government departments on a range of development projects. These include: transportation projects, flood mitigation schemes, and other preparedness and assessment projects.
A dearth of data
The challenge the organization faces on the ground is a lack of accurate, up-to-date geographic data of the city.
TWB’s team wants to improve its understanding and identification of flood risk areas, largely driven by the devastating effect floods can have on the city’s informal settlements.
The problem is that satellite imagery of the region is expensive and doesn’t offer full coverage. The cost of using a manned aircraft is also extremely high.  This is why, in 2015, TWB decided to look into how drones could help – the idea being to use them to collect high-resolution geospatial data, cost effectively. Thus TWB turned to Drone Adventures, a non-profit group that uses senseFly eBee mapping drones, and the team at Humanitarian OpenStreetMap (HOSM).

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BAM international is being investigated for laxity that caused serious injuries to one of the Occupational Safety and Health Authority’s workers. The workers are working on Terminal 3 building site at Julius Nyerere International Airport.
BAM International is the operating company of Royal BAM Group. It is one of Europe’s largest contracting companies. It is currently  constructing Terminal 3 building site at Julius Nyerere International Airport. OSHA  is accusing them of failing to adhere to safety regulations, consequently causing an accident.
The accident
The accident involving the truck driver took place on the 7th of September. This is after he got an electric shock at the Terminal 3 construction site. Apparently workers have complained to BAM management in vain about a live, lose electric cables at the site. Martin Otieno  who is the Airport Police Commander gave confirmation about  the accident.
According to (OSHA) 48 hours after the incident had taken place, BAM had not reported the incident within 24 hours.  This is also  a requirement  by the construction safety regulations.
Eleuter Mbilinyi is the Osha Public Relations Manager. According to him an investigation about the incident was ongoing. He also added  that the authority would be in a position to offer details when the inquiry was complete.
Eric van Zuthem is the  BAM International Director Area for Africa. He confirmed that the accident had taken place but ,declined to give details asking The Citizen to wait until the company investigates what had happened.
However he denied that the incident was not reported to Osha. He confirms that the victim was in  Muhimbili National Hospital and was doing fine.
According to sources the construction firm did not take any safety precautions  before the accident. They also did not put any spotters that enable workers to avoid danger at the site.

Source: Construction review

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The possibility of cancelling licenses given to private sector investors to run the Nigeria’s power sector has been revoked by the federal government of Nigeria.
According to Mr. Babatunde Fashola cancellation of the exercise will send a negative message to prospective investors in the country’s power sector. He says that revoking it will make investors leave the country.
Privatization
Mr. Fashola agrees that there are problems and he understands that four years after privatization there is a transition period. Additionally some more work needs to happen before the expected benefits come to fruition.
He stressed the need for institutions at state and  federal levels to take actions that should help the investors play their part effectively, implement enunciate policies and extant laws. He stated their role in this regard are sort out in the Electric Power Sector Reform Act 2005. To which the privatization of the power sector took place.
He asserted that the meter provision is not a monopoly of DisCos. According to him its supervision falls within the mandates of the Nigerian Electricity Management Service Agency (NEMSA) and the Nigerian Electricity Regulation Commission (NERC). The government would support the provision of the product to demonstrate access.
The intention of the democratization of meter provision is to reduce conflict between customers and DisCos. Also to reduce losses in the sector and assist the electricity firms which cannot afford to fund meters.
He notes that the negotiated price for large consumers would likely  be lower than N80 per kwh or more. Eligible customers may apply to the NERC to privately acquire power, independent of DisCos. Of course this will occur only on a willing buyer, willing seller basis.

Source: Construction review


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The government of Tanzania has plans to launch the second phase of the construction of the standard gauge railway (SGR) line. The project intends to link the commercial city of Dar es Salaam and the capital of Dodoma.
Speaking during the Eighth East and Central Africa Roads and Rail Infrastructure Summit opening in Dar es Salaam Prof Makame Mbarawa, the Minister for Works, Transport and Communications did confirm the construction will commence next month.
Phase II of the standard gauge railway stretches from Morogoro to Dodoma, a distance of 336 km. Additionally, once the project is complete, Tanzania has plans to introduce a fast and modern train. The train has a capacity speed of 160kph. On the other side the freight train will have a top speed of 120kph.

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Recent reports that solar capacity will soon exceed nuclear capacity reveal an important fact. It also hides a crucial distinction needed to understand the context of energy production, and use and consequences of choices among supply options for the future.
As executive director of the Waterloo Institute for Sustainable Energy (WISE) and lead author of the Equinox Blueprint Energy 2030, a technological roadmap for a low-carbon electrified future, I have investigated energy options, alternatives and their utility. I have also found that people get confused with terminology.
Capacity installed in kilowatts (kW) is not equal to energy produced in kilowatt hours (kWh)—and the energy services we demand and pay for (such as cooking, cooling, lighting, entertainment) is measured in kilowatt hours. For large-scale, industrial purposes, output is measured in megawatt hours (MWh) or gigawatt hours (GWh).
The technical capacity of any energy technology to deliver useful energy is measured as energy output. Because of the efficiency of energy conversion, solar energy output tends to be low.
For example, the energy produced from a large number of solar arrays combined as 1,000 megawatts (MW) installed capacity will deliver, on average, an energy equivalent of 10 to 12 per cent of its capacity. In contrast, a nuclear plant delivers energy at 80 to 90 per cent of its rated capacity.

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The US$ 8m Kiambu Mall which is currently in its final stages will open its doors to the public in December. The dates shifted from August to December due to construction delays.
Mugaa Investment Developers chairman Peter Burugu blames the delays on political uncertainty in the country which has slowed down shipment of construction materials. However, construction work at the site is now at its peak, as the developer aims to open before Christmas holidays.
 “This mall is a first for Kiambu County which has set standards for future developers coming here. We intend to give an alternative to those traveling from Kiambu to Nairobi for their shopping,” said Mr Burugu.
Brands in Kiambu Mall
The mega mall will house big brands like Botswana retailer Choppies. It will be the mall’s anchor tenant. Other tenants include Java, Nairobi Hospital, Ashleys, Vivo, and Commercial Bank of Africa among others.
The sub-anchor, Nairobi Hospital has a fully-fledged mini-hospital complete with ambulance services for emergencies. Both will be the pull factor for the required footfall necessary to make this Mall a success.
The development which has five floors will constitute of shops in the first three floors while the top most floor will be offices. All floors will have elevators and escalators which assist shoppers to navigate round the Mall with speed and efficiency.
Currently, several business developments are taking place in Kiambu, especially real estate. There is Migaa, Edenville, Five Star developments, Runda paradise among others surrounding Kiambu town.
Additionally, this initiative will provide shopping convenience for the residents in the estates and its main target customers are the middle class.

Source: Construction review

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Constant water cuts at the town of Rundu in Namibia are angering the town’s residents. So much so, they are forced to wake up in the middle of the night to fill up their water containers for use during the day. This is because taps run dry by morning and sometimes lasts all day. This is despite the fact the Kavango River from where the town sources water is within walking distance.
The water crisis in Rundu has lasted for several months now with no end in sight. Furthermore, it seems to be getting worse with each passing day. Understandably so, this situation has since stirred discord among residents as the water crisis affects their daily activities. This is because only a few households and some businesses can afford reservoir tanks.
NamWater water supply
Reports suggest that the town council is to blame for the situation. According to Daniel Langhart, the council is allegedly failing to buy enough prepaid units of water. Residents are now forced to flock to the river to bath or fetch water. This is even with the fact that they always paid their water utility bills with the town council.
Acting CEO of Rundu, Mathews Naironga, said that NamWater are to blame. He added that this is because the utility is apparently unable to meet the town’s water needs. According to him, the volume of purified water NamWater pumps to the town is small and only suburbs that are close to the reservoirs get most of the water. This means the rest of the locations that a re considerably far from the same suffer..
The acting CEO emphasized that the biggest problem is that NamWater is purifying very little water for the town while “the demand is too high”.

Source: Construction review

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South Sudan, is not considered to be a water-scarce country. However, civil war and hyperinflation have created a water crisis. To put things in perspective, the cost relative of water to income is six times greater than the internationally recognized five.
Tough logistics
Providing clean drinking water in the country is proving hard. Water is available, but facilities and resources to purify it for drinking are lacking. The pipe infrastructure serves just 17% of Juba’s permanent population of about 370,000. The same infrastructure is also in need of repair and upgrading. The rest of the city depends on supplies from almost 700 mostly privately owned water tankers. These have also increased their prices due to the current economic crisis.
According to aid agency Oxfam, in previous years tankers were operating on a profit margin of 45%. These profits have since turned to sharp losses. Oxfam’s water and sanitation adviser Mariana Matoso gives this as the reason why an increasing number of tankers pump water straight from the river. This is preferred to getting it from a treatment plant.
The businesses have since resorted to selling dirty water pumped for free in a bid to survive. Furthermore, the fighting that erupted in Juba last year halted the Japanese-funded project for the city’s water treatment plant.

Rivers and swamps
Many households in Juba have cut their purchases of clean water by half, said Oxfam. This leaves them with less than five litres per person per day. This is less than WHO’s minimum of 20l necessary for basic needs. On the other hand, the cutting back on water has increased the risk of contracting water borne diseases. This is according to Haile Gashaw, water and sanitation specialist for the U.N. children’s agency UNICEF.

Source: Construction review

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